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Some of the most profound and surprising attributes of hypnotherapy involve changes in thoughts and behaviours that simply cannot be made by will-power alone. These attributes will provide the subject matter for many blogs to come. However, one of the most surprising components of hypnotherapy lies in the levels of relaxation that can be achieved. You may ask yourself what is so special about relaxation. After all, we all know how to relax, and do it many times daily, don’t we? It may be easy to just brush off this significant component as something that is so obvious and normal that it doesn’t warrant any further notice.

However… While many of us do know how to relax properly, we often do not take the time to do it, precisely because of this attitude. It is so simple and so easy that it just gets put aside in favour of daily chores and work assignments.

And yet, what happens if we do not take the time to fully relax as our bodies need? Well, much of it relates to the central nervous system, which has an active and a passive component. During our daily lives, we often stimulate the more active part which is typically tied up with the adrenal ‘fight or flight’ response. Even in the most mundane of days this response will be activated (boredom is a special kind of stress in itself). To neutralise this response, we use the passive side of the central nervous system, which is stimulated during periods of rest. If this does not occur then the body remains in a state of alert, which has been shown to be detrimental to health. Part of the reason for this is because the body’s natural ability to heal itself, to restore itself to its ideal condition, occurs when the passive side of the central nervous system is in use. Taking the time to relax is essential therefore to maintain our physical well-being as well as the obvious emotional benefits of not being filled with adrenalin!

I think this is interesting in relation to stress-related illness. It is not that the illness ‘is all in your head’, rather it is that the physiological functions that neutralise the state of alert have not been triggered. It seems our culture of ‘busy doing’ has delegated relaxation as a non-essential activity. In light of the widely recognised physical functioning of the central nervous system, does it occur to you that relaxation is more important than what might be regarded as selfish pampering? Perhaps we can learn to make it a priority in our daily lives. It’s something I am working on as we speak. Hypnotherapy can help, especially as it is a guided process, and it allows you to enjoy relaxing deeper than most can achieve by themselves. This deep relaxation alone enables you to activate the healing capacities of your body, and teaches you how to recreate this for yourself outside of sessions. And yes, there are the other, more wierd and wonderful elements of altering unhelpful subconscious beliefs, but the element of relaxation in hypnotherapy is more crucial for our well-being than you might know.

Some of the most profound and surprising attributes of hypnotherapy involve changes in thoughts and behaviours that simply cannot be made by will-power alone. These attributes will provide the subject matter for many blogs to come. However, one of the most surprising components of hypnotherapy lies in the levels of relaxation that can be achieved. You may ask yourself what is so special about relaxation. After all, we all know how to relax, and do it many times daily, don’t we? It may be easy to just brush off this significant component as something that is so obvious and normal that it doesn’t warrant any further notice.